Adopt an Object

Bringing you closer to our collections

Adopt an ObjectAdopt one of the Museum’s amazing objects and you will be helping to care for our nationally Designated collections and supporting our education programmes. Each one of the items in our collections is special and tells a story. We have chosen a selection of our visitors' most loved objects which are on display in our 10 award-winning Museums. This is your opportunity to create a personal connection with that item by adopting it for 12 months. You will receive a number of benefits whilst knowing that you are really helping to support our charitable aims.

This would also make a fantastic gift idea for someone for any occasion.

Did you know?
All of the Museum’s collections are Designated of national importance. They include art and memorabilia relating to industrial history, Coalbrookdale ironwork and engines, decorative ceramics, especially Coalport China and Maws’ tiles and the Darby Collection which covers the homes, furnaces, possessions and records of the Darby family.

For full terms and conditions click here.

We do not charge postage for Adopt an Object so please select Free Shipping at checkout.

  1. Startled Stag

    Startled Stag

    Out of stock

    Quick view:

    This is a beautiful example of a cast-iron sculpture designed by Christophe Fratin (1801-1864) and produced by the Coalbrookdale Company.  The item appears as item Number 146 on a Company price list of 1877 and is priced at £13 5s 0d.
    Christophe Fratin was a highly skilled artist and one of the first French sculptors to successfully portray animals in bronze and cast-iron. Fratin’s sculptures were very popular across Europe as well as England and America. He created many wild and domestic animal scenes and his ability to capture an animal in full flight or at the exact moment of being caught by a predator was unmatched by any artist before or since his time.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you

    Learn More

    £50.00
  2. Noah’s Ark Tiles

    Noah’s Ark Tiles

    In stock

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    This is a chance to adopt the delightful set of four Noah’s Ark hand-painted tile panels depicting a fox, tiger, rhino and owl. Made in 1935 by Carter & Co. from Poole, Dorset these tiles were rescued by Ironbridge Gorge Museum staff in the mid-1980s from the King Edward VII hospital before it was demolished. Tile panels like these were a common feature in many children’s wards in hospitals across the country but very few now remain as hospitals have been demolished and replaced with more modern buildings. Tiles revolutionised hygiene in hospitals and the cheery characters painted carefully on each tile cheered up both patients and staff.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you

    Learn More

    £50.00
  3. Grocer's Till

    Grocer's Till

    In stock

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    This is a splendid example of a Victorian National Cash Register which was donated to the Museum in 2011. It now takes pride of place on the counter in the Grocer’s Shop at Blists Hill Victorian Town. This building is based on the Grocer’s Shop which was in Market Street in Oakengates and was run by the Owen family. The family still operate a business from these premises and upon finding the cash register in the attic, kindly offered it to the Museum to display. The till still bears a label on it which says it was supplied by LR Leroy & Sons from Stoke-on-Trent and of course payment is made in pounds, shillings and pence.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you

    Learn More

    £50.00
  4. Peacock Tile Panel

    Peacock Tile Panel

    In stock

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    Made in 1928 by Maw & Co, this is an eye-catching glazed tile panel of a peacock made using the tube lining method. Peacocks were a favoured subject of the Art Nouveau period. In 1852 the Maw family and their workforce moved to Broseley in the Ironbridge Gorge having been attracted by the good-quality, cheap local clay. There they established the Benthall Encaustic Tile and Majolica Works. By the 1870s Maw & Co were supplying tiles for buildings all over the British Empire and beyond. In May 1883 the firm moved into a new purpose-built factory at Jackfield (now Maws Craft Centre) and became the largest tile works in the world.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums

    Learn More

    £250.00
  5. Retriever

    Retriever

    Out of stock

    Quick view:

    Why not adopt a dog that doesn’t need walking? This friendly Retriever was designed by French artist Christophe Fratin and is a bronze sculpture cast by the Coalbrookdale Company in the 1850s. Fratin was a highly skilled artist and one of the first French sculptors to successfully portray animals in bronze and cast-iron. Fratin’s sculptures were very popular across Europe as well as England and America. He created many wild and domestic animal scenes and his ability to capture an animal in full flight or at the exact moment of being caught by a predator was unmatched by any artist before or since his time.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums

    Learn More

    £250.00
  6. Dentist’s Chair

    Dentist’s Chair

    In stock

    Quick view:

    This popular exhibit can be found in the Chemist’s Shop at Blists Hill Victorian Town. It reminds us all how much modern dentistry has improved since Victorian times as we no longer have to have teeth extracted painfully with shoppers looking on! Victorians had a real reason to hate the dentist who removed teeth with no anaesthetic. The chair is made from cast-iron and has a very ornate back. The seat, backrest and neck support are padded and covered with red velvet, it has an adjustable two part wooden foot rest and the seating position is fully adjustable by mechanical means. A central pedestal has two adjustable arms attached, one arm carries the 'rinse and spit' bowls, which have a pipe to connect them to the water supply, the second arm holds an opaque, white glass tray which holds the dentist's hand tools.

    What you receive:
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums

    Learn More

    £250.00
  7. Andromeda

    Andromeda

    In stock

    Quick view:

    This stunning life-size nude female was designed by acclaimed artist John Bell (1811-1895) and was made by the Coalbrookdale Company. It was exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851 and depicts the Greek Legend. She was the daughter of the King and Queen of the Aethopians, and to appease the wrath of Neptune, Andromeda was chained to the rocks and exposed to the sea monster. Perseus, upon his return from killing the Gorgon, slew the monster and set Andromeda free. Queen Victorian and Prince Albert are said to have thought highly of Coalbrookdale products and had an Andromeda statue installed at Osborne in the early 1850s.

    What you receive
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums
    - Credit line on the object (where possible)
    - Invitation to a behind the scenes tour with a curator

    Learn More

    £1,000.00
  8. Deerhound Table

    Deerhound Table

    In stock

    Quick view:

    Made in 1855 for the Paris International Exhibition, this magnificent table weighs 16cwt and is made entirely of cast-iron. Designed by the respected artist John Bell (1811-1895), the table top measuring 4 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 6 inches has been painted to represent marble. Four gilt Deerhounds sit on their haunches with their heads looking upwards and the crest of the Hargreaves painted on their collars.  The Museum was able to purchase the table in 1986 thanks to grants from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Victoria and Albert Grant in Aid Fund, The National Art Collections Fund, The Monument Trust and Partridge Fine Art Fund. It is believed that the table is unique.

    What you receive
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums
    - Credit line on the object (where possible)
    - Invitation to a behind the scenes tour with a curator

    Learn More

    £1,000.00
  9. 1714 Pot

    1714 Pot

    In stock

    Quick view:

    This is not just any cast-iron cooking pot…this is one that changed the world! You can adopt the Museum’s oldest surviving example of the patented cooking pots that were pioneered by Abraham Darby I when he used coke to smelt iron in his blast furnace instead of charcoal. He first used this technique in 1709 and this pot dated 1714 shows how the mass production of an everyday domestic essential began to revolutionise the iron industry leading to the Industrial Revolution. So although this pot may be small, it represents a massive turning point in history which has been shaping our lives since.

    What you receive
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums
    - Credit line on the object (where possible)
    - Invitation to a behind the scenes tour with a curator

    Learn More

    £1,000.00
  10. Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee Vase

    Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee Vase

    In stock

    Quick view:

    In 1903, The Windsor Magazine recorded that Queen Victoria was “pleased to inspect a beautiful vase, which had been modelled and decorated in honour of the Record Reign.” There are many examples of Coalport’s connections with Queen Victoria but this is undoubtedly one of the most magnificent. The firm of F. and C. Osler, with a retail house in Oxford Street, London in 1895 or 1896 commissioned Coalport to produce a limited edition of 50 vases for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. This was a highly prestigious order for a very important occasion, and gave Coalport the opportunity to showcase the quality of their products. One side shows a profile of the mature Queen, surrounded by cameos representing achievements of her reign such as the Forth Bridge and a motor car contrasting with aspects of national life in 1837 on the reverse such as a stage coach and old London Bridge. All the many details have Royal connotations from the lion’s paw feet to the finely moulded crown finial, and display the immense skill and expertise available at the factory. The main artist was J.H.Plant.

    What you receive
    - Certificate of adoption with a picture of your object
    - A sheet of information about your object
    - A text credit on the website plus an opportunity to say why you have adopted the object and what it means to you.
    - An invitation for you and a guest to visit the Museums
    - Credit line on the object (where possible)
    - Invitation to a behind the scenes tour with a curator

    Learn More

    £1,000.00